Technique Tuesday 8- Hip Hinge

Hi all

This post is for everyone. Technique Tuesday 8 explores hip hinging. Learn to move and lift correctly from the hips to avoid excessive pressure on the low back. I do want to mention that arching from the lower back to bend forward is not going to blow out your back, this is a natural movement. However, if you do it repeatedly, over and over again (due to work or any other reason) or you lift heavy weights with that posture, you could increase the chances of injuring your lower back.
Here you go-

Until next time

Pursue excellence

Abhijit Minhas PT

(BPT, MS, CMP, FMT)

Technique Tuesday 7- Hip abduction in side lying

Hi everyone,

Here’s the latest edition. You know the drill.

Until next Tuesday or a new post

Pursue excellence

Abhijit Minhas PT

(BPT, MS, CMP, FMT)

Postural Correction to prevent neck pain

Hi all

Since most of us are working from home on our makeshift workstations/couches etc there are too many sore necks and backs going around. Here’s a new video to hopefully keep you away from those statistic. Hope it helps.

Until next time

Pursue Excellence

Abhijit Minhas PT

(BPT, MS, CMP, FMT)

 

Technique Tuesday 5 – Bridging exercise

Hi Everyone

Hope you all are safe during these difficult times. Here’s the next edition of #technique Tuesday for you all. I’ll let the video do the talking.

What are some cues that you like to use? Lemme know in the comments.

Until next time

Pursue Excellence

Abhijit Minhas PT

(BPT, MS, CMP, FMT)

#Technique Tuesday 4- The Lunge

On this edition of #techniquetuesday we will discuss the Lunge. The lunge is a great  lower body exercise that works some of the major muscle groups of the legs- the Quads, the Hammies and the glutes. In addition to this, it also trains dynamic single leg stability and motor control and depending upon the variation you chose to perform one could also throw in half kneeling stability work and eccentric quadriceps work into the mix. All in all its a great exercise.

However, it doesn’t seem to be the most enjoyable exercise as many seem to hurt themselves while doing it. So lets try to do em right.

Avoid these common mistakes-

 

 

WATCH OUT FOR-

  • Knees going past the toes
  • Heel lifting of the floor

 

 

 

 

WATCH OUT FOR-

  • Knees going past the inner border of the foot (aka excessive valgus)

 

 

INSTEAD TRY THIS- 

 

TRY TO –

  • Shift your weight back on to your heel with the heel of the front leg flat on the ground.

 

 

 

TRY TO –

  • Keep your knees aligned over your feet

 

VARIATION-

The above lunge exercises seem to work the anterior chain with the focus on quadriceps (Don’t get me wrong, you are still working all the muscles). As a variation, to get more of my posterior chain muscles (Hamstrings, glutes) or to avoid straining sore knees/quads I like this variation-

 

Keep at it, do it right and do it often. Until next time

Pursue excellence-

Abhijit Minhas

(BPT,MS,CMP,FMT)

 

 

# Technique Tuesday 2- The Pushup

On #techniquetuesday part duex, we discuss pushups.
In the 1st video you see some of the common mistakes when performing a pushup. Elbows are not close to the body but flaring out, not going deep enough and not going down and coming up as a whole but instead bending and arching from the back which might be indicative of weakness or improper engagement of the core.


2nd video shows corrections for the above along with finding a proper neutral starting position for the pushup

 

image1.jpeg

 
If you are unable to perform a push-up with proper form, regress by doing it off a bench, table or mats as demonstrated in the 3rd video.

 


4th video is another regression of the pushup off the wall. 


Do it right and do it often. Until next time

Pursue excellence-

Abhijit Minhas

(BPT,MS,CMP,FMT)

#TechniqueTuesday 1- Quad & Hip Flexors Stretch

The intention of #techniquetuesday is to highlight mistakes and demonstrate corrections for common exercises that I see often. For the very first one, we will discuss everyone’s favourite, the quadriceps stretch and the hip flexor stretch. Here goes-

Do it right and do it often.

Until then

Pursue Excellence

Abhijit Minhas

(BPT,MS,CMP,FMT)

Drive your woes away

Ladies and gentlemen

Got a long drive ahead of you that you are dreading? Feel stiff and achy sitting all day. Below I present to you some simple exercises, stretches and strategies that you should try and incorporate if you know you would be behind the wheel for a few hours. Make them a non negotiable part of your drive (safety permitting) and more likely than not, your body will thank you for it.

Here you go-

1. While driving

(Disclaimer- do not take your hands of the wheel for more then 2-3 seconds and never both together, driving safety comes first. Do not let these exercises distract you from the primary activity of driving, I do these often and they are like second nature to me. Only perform them if you feel comfortable to do so safely depending upon your traffic conditions. Practice them at home or work first and then incorporate them carefully while driving. If you still feel unforgettable, avoid this and try the strategies in step two).

2. Take breaks often and move

Try holding the stretches in the above videos for about 30 seconds and repeat 2-3 times. For neck, wrist, back exercises that are not stretches, try about 10 repetitions. Although you ‘might’ feel some discomfort due to staying in one place for some a few hours, none of these exercises should cause pain. If they progressively increase pain and/or discomfort every time you do it, STOP. DO WHAT YOU CAN.

Always remember, the body is not meant to sit in one position all day and ‘motion is lotion’ for your body. Consult your physio if you have pre existing conditions as some of these exercises might not be right for you.

Pursue excellence

Abhijit Minhas PT

(BPT, MS, CMP, FMT)

Check your Neck before you Wreck your Neck

This one resonates close to me. It was the winter of 2013, excited for having cleared my board exam to practice as a physical therapist in the US, I had just landed my first job overseas. However, apart from being my first job this was not just anywhere in the US, I was to begin working in ‘New York City’ (Oh the dream, I recall). Not just anywhere in NYC, this office was in Manhattan, and if you know anything about that awesome city, it was not just anywhere in Manhattan, it was right in the heart of it all in midtown Manhattan. It came with its pressures, servicing a relatively high end clientele in a very busy office. And if there is one thing I could tell you about New Yorkers it is this, they are extremely driven, outcome oriented and unapologetically blatant. There was no ‘see me for 3x/week for 4 weeks to see results’ or ‘physical therapy effects take time to show’. They would have none of that spiel. No pressure right (haha)? Dead wrong.

Within the first week I crumbled under the pressure like a house of cards(though I didn’t show it to anyone). But that’s New York, if you have lived there, you’d know what I mean. Lest I digress more, part of the problem along with me just being a new kid on the block was that doing countless patient charts looking down for hours apart from the non stop physical work that comes with working as a physio, I started developing neck pain with a burning sensation down my left shoulder blade. With the passing weeks, it only got worse. The problem was that a lot of my patients were seeing me for more or less a similar problem spending hours on their workstations. If I couldn’t fix myself, how could I help them? I did what I could for myself and them but it was no walk in the park. A few years and grey hair have imparted some wisdom and learning.  Having seen hundreds of patients since then, I am now at a better position to tackle this issue. Below are some of the most common advice I give to patients/people who are at a risk of neck pain. A general advice though, these exercises and strategies are to prevent this unpleasant occurrence. If you are already in pain, You must seek professional help and not rely on the videos presented below. There could be many reasons why you could have neck pain and everything is not covered here.

We all have been in this position. It could be a busy day at work staring at your monitor for 8+ hours, staring down into your books pulling an all nighter before that big test, driving through endless traffic to get home ending up spending more time behind the wheel than you’d like to, maybe a car accident, a weight training injury at the gym or just sleeping wrong, very few have managed to escape this annoying and often debilitating condition. And just like if you hang around with the wrong company for too long, you’d find trouble, if the neck remains troubled and painful, chances are that the shoulders, upper back, arms and/or the head might feel some of that pain too. That’s right, often pain (or tingling/numbness) running down the arms, shoulder, upper back pain and/or headaches ‘might’ be because of that nagging neck pain. This is important so I’d like you to read that line again. However, like I mentioned before, neck pain is a complicated topic and beyond the scope of just one blog.

So today’s post and my first ever not for physios, but just people in general who might benefit from common advise we give to our patients is going to be preventative in nature. You probably won’t be surprised to know that a big chunk of neck pain clients that I have seen over the years come from just sitting wrong and too long, staring into a screen all day, snap chatting every few minutes etc than from car accidents (this might be different for the USA and Canada, there are a lot of MVA’s here).

So here are some exercises and strategies you could use if you are at a risk to experiencing neck pain or its related symptoms.

  1. Good Posture

2. Chin tucks

3. Chin tucks and extension

(If you feel an increase in pain, tingling, numbness, dizziness etc with every repetetion, stop!!)

4. If you look on one side for extended  periods of time, correction for that-

5.Thoracic extension

6. Neck stretches

7. Sitting posture and recommendations

(If you’re a image conscious New Yorker, I know your struggle. Don’t carry a sheet to work, shell out some $$ and get that lumbar roll, lol).

8. Setting timer/ reminder

9. Finally, don’t forget to MOVE!!

The key is to not think of them as exercises but as habits. Habits that are acquired and need to be incorporated into one’s  routine on a daily note. Foremost remember, if you are in pain, go see a good physio and get it assessed. Some of the above advice might not be right for you depending upon what is going on. If some of the exercises seem to increase your pain, stop immediately. Comment below if you have questions.

Until the next post and always

Pursue excellence

Abhijit Minhas PT

(BPT, MS, CMP, FMT)