Median Nerve Neurodynamics Part 2- Home Exercises

Hello

Following up on my blog post last week (which you could find Here), in this blog post I put forth some Median nerve Neurodynamics home exercises. The general principle remains the same for me. Start slow, try to keep the exercises pain free/threat free if possible or at least to a minimum with head bend to the same side slowing progressing to head neutral and eventually away from the side that is being stretched. I start with sliders and then progress to tensioners.

If any of the exercises increase pain levels, I instruct my patients to either go gentler and if that does not help, I ask them to stop.

Enough said, here are some videos-

1. Unilateral exercises with nerve mobilization @ the wrist level-

2. Unilateral exercises with nerve mobilization @ the shoulder and the fingers-

3. Unilateral exercises with nerve mobilization @ the elbow with head neutral and slowly progressing to sliders.

(Starting position is shoulder abduction not flexion as mentioned in the video, sorry for the error but you knew that).

4. Unilateral exercises with nerve mobilization @ the elbow level with sliders and tensioners –

 

 

5. Bilateral exercises like the prayer stretch, butler’s busy bee-

 

 

I would love to know some of your favorite exercises, tweaks and variations. That’s all I got for this post. Keep fighting the good fight. Until next time.

Pursue excellence.

Abhijit Minhas

(BPT, MS, CMP, FMT)

Median Nerve Neurodynamics

Hi everyone,

This blog post will be a quick one. I often utilize the upper limb tension tests (ULTT) to assess patients with pain and other radicular symptoms going down the arm. I check first the unaffected side and then the affected side to compare asymmetries and also use it for mobilization of nerve roots. However, as a reoccuring theme I have been aggressive with my tension tests in the past just like so many  other techniques and have had less than favourable results. So in accordance with my ‘less is more’  thought process (in terms of pressure/force/aggressivness) I have made some tweaks in how I perform my nerve mobilizations. This is especially true for ULTT and LLTT tests and mobs because these are provocative manuvers and ‘I like lightning bolts running down my arms and legs’ said NO ONE EVER. Today we will discuss Median Nerve Neurodynamics.

Components of Median nerve neurodynamics involve-

  1. Shoulder abducted to about 60 degree. (Initially, I’d abduct to around 90-110. However, Butler and his colleagues at the NOI group have suggested that shoulder abduction at 60 degrees puts the most tension on the Median nerve root and my patients also seem to tolerate this a little better so I now do it at around 60).
  2. Shoulder depression (I have stopped pushing down on it too much as it can be very aggressive and threatening to some patients. I just try to avoid shoulder hiking).
  3. Full external rotation of shoulder.
  4. Full elbow extension.
  5. Full forearm supination. (In the past, I would often leave some slack here due to focusing on shoulder depression. Try to get end range supination).
  6. Full wrist extension.
  7. Full finger extension. (Important to make sure that the PIP and DIP do not flex).

Here is a video demonstration of the test with some variations.

 

Please note that in one of the mob variation with elbow movements, I do not press the wrist down into complete extension. That is because prior testing of this variation of nerve mobilization was very threat inducing and provocative and I didn’t want to be very aggressive.

What are your thoughts? Do you have some tweaks on hand placement, body positioning, force applied or different variations?  I’d love to hear it.

In the next blog post we will discuss some home exercise programs (HEP) for self mobilization. Happy flossing (but go a little easy maybe). Until next time.

Pursue excellence.

Abhijit Minhas

(BPT, MS, CMP, FMT)